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Tuesday, March 5

  1. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited ... The Chinese Exclusion Act was signed into law in May of 1882. This law was written for the US …
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    The Chinese Exclusion Act was signed into law in May of 1882. This law was written for the US to ban Chinese Immigration due to the influx of Chinese due to the California Gold Rush in the 1850’s and continued with subsequent large labor projects, like the building of the First Transcontinental Railroad. During the early years of the gold rush, the Chinese and other immigrants were well received and tolerated, but as time progressed and gold became harder to find, the tolerance for these immigrants decreased significantly. Many anti-Chinese organizations were formed and blamed the Chinese for the Chinese for depressing wage levels since they were willing to work for many hours with low pay.
    This cartoon was created by its author to show to anyone opposed to the immigration of the Chinese the injustice that these immigrants had to face because they wanted the jobs nobody else wanted to do. This cartoon was created by an American who was not opposed to foreign immigration, therefore could have potential bias, just because the US banned the Chinese from immigrating does not necessarily mean that peace and order cease to exist just because there are no Chinese immigrants. This cartoon is significant during this period in time because it mocks the legislation for barring out the Chinese even though they bring potential benefits with them.
    MSF
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/Boss_Tweed%2C_Thomas_Nast.jpg}
    Thomas Nast was one of the noblest cartoonists during the Gilded Age, roughly 1870-1900. He was considered to be the “Father of the American Cartoon,” and he had a very successful career as a caricaturist for Harper’s Weekly, where “The Brains” was produced. Nast, throughout the Civil War was a faithful and devoted adversary to slavery and a tremendous supporter of black civil rights. During this period, social classes were deviating from each other and there were now extreme poor and the very wealthy with the rapid growth of urbanization and the rise of cities. Differences in social classes as well as the industrial revolution influenced the fraudulent problems of America under the outer layer and how power was envied for many.
    With this political cartoon, “The Brains” published on October 21st, 1871, Thomas Nast depicted a businessman with a thirst for power and wealth. He did this by replacing the man’s head with a bag of money. At the time of this cartoon, the Gilded Age had just begun and was already uncovering many flaws under the gold covered outer shell. Corruption was beginning to spread throughout America. The man in the cartoon is Boss Tweed and we know this because of the reference to the Tammany Hall scandal. Boss Tweed, after rising up the social ladder, was elected to head Tammany Hall, where he could have a great impact on many high-ranking jobs. He abused this power and got much money for his own use out of the scandals. Thomas Nast helped inform the people about Boss Tweed’s crimes by means of his cartoon and many of Tweed’s colleagues in Tammany Hall turned him in to stop his crimes. The bag of money on the man’s head reveals how selfish and wealth hungry some of the people were during this time. This also shows what was driving the minds and brains of the men in charge: selfish thirst for money. This source was created for the people of America, and to uncover how some innocent people were being cheated. Even though gilded means covered in gold, problems and corruption were spreading throughout America under the surface of prosperity.

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    8:36 am
  2. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited ... htmldiff2"The American Ganges" Nast, Thomas, September 30, 1871 htmldiff3The Americ…
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    htmldiff2"The American Ganges" Nast, Thomas, September 30, 1871
    htmldiff3The American River Ganges htmldiff4is an informative political cartoon that was published on September 30, 1871 in htmldiff5Harper’s Weekly htmldiff6by Thomas Nast htmldiff7. htmldiff8This cartoon is suggesting that immigration and the refusal to assimilate to have corrupted the school systems in New York. With the increase in Irish immigration, Roman Catholic schools started to show up all around New York during the 1870’s. Many Catholics dropped out of the mostly protestant public school system to attend these newly founded Roman Catholic schools, usually founded by the Irish themselves. However, when a powerful political machine located in New York City, which was based in Tammy Hall, forced the democratic legislation to pass a law that provided government funding for Irish Catholic schools, the htmldiff9Harper’s Weekly htmldiff10acted. The htmldiff11Harper’s Weekly htmldiff12closely associated itself with the Republican Party so it is acceptable to suggest this cartoon would go against a piece of Democratic legislation. In response to this law, Nast and htmldiff13Harper’s Weekly htmldiff14posted this political cartoon. It shows Tammy Hall politicians lowering children from a destroyed public school with the universal distress symbol over it (The American flag upside down) into the “American River Ganges” which is full of crocodiles dressed as Bishops. The crocodiles dressed as Bishops, as well as the Tammy Hall Politicians, represented the Catholics taking children away from the public school system and forcing them into Catholic schools. This was significant at the time because of the tension between Protestants and Catholics especially in the school systems and between the Irish and Americans.
    SP
    {The_Raven-Harrison&Blaine.jpg}
    This cartoon was written for Puck Magazine in 1890 and was creatively written by Joseph Keppler who made this cartoon out of ideas from Edgar Allen Poe’s The Raven . During the time in which this cartoon was drawn, elections were getting ready to begin, and one of the people running in the election was Benjamin Harrison, grandson of William Henry Harrison. Although Benjamin was a great man, he was not America’s most influential president. While Benjamin was president, one of the main things he did was raised the debt to one billion dollars. Odviously, Benjamin was not an exact image of William Henry Harrison because he was not as strong as him. Therefore, this cartoon is depicting the fact that Benjamin was not the right president for the state of the country, at that particular time, our country would have greatly benefitted from a stronger president.
    In this cartoon, Benjamin is wearing an oversized hat, and is being glared at by the so-called “raven” (who is James G. Blaine, the former secretary of state) from above. The significance of Benjamin wearing the oversized hat is to show how different he is from his grandfather, former president William Henry Harrison. Benjamin was very weak and not a good leader for America, therefore he is being engulfed by the problems he has to fight while being president. The hat symbolizes this by being much too big. James G. Blaine is the raven figure looking down at Benjamin from above because he does not think he is being a good president for America and thinks he himself would be a better president.
    The main idea of this cartoon is to effect the Republican party during this specific election time. Keppler wanted the Republicans to be negatively effected by this so that Benjamin would not be reelected in the returning election. He did not want Benjamin to be reelected because of the decisions that they were making. The republicans supported the McKinley tariff which supported the larger companies over the smaller companies, therefore making the people very upset. Overall, the main idea of this cartoon was to basically get people to not vote for the Republican party.

    Political Cartoons--Period 5
    CMA
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    8:18 am
  3. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited ... The cartoon shows five men with their hands out telling the immigrant crossing the bridge to s…
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    The cartoon shows five men with their hands out telling the immigrant crossing the bridge to stop. These five men also have shadows, which portray there past life as former immigrants or relatives of an immigrant. The five men’s shadows also resemble the new immigrant. The five men standing there are wealthy looking and represent the American dream, yet they are denying a fellow immigrant access to America. Joseph Keppler uses this cartoon to display how hypocritical they were being because they were immigrants themselves.
    The cartoon was created to show old immigrants how hypocritical they were being towards new immigrants in denying them the chance at the American dream. The old immigrants were now apart of American society and some had become wealthy in America. They blamed the poor city conditions on the new immigrants. The new immigrants would work for a low wage and had high birth rates; this caused any labor strike to be anti productive. The American Protective association sprang up in result of the immigrants working for low wages. The association tried to put an end to immigration. This is around the time the cartoon was published and the cartoon tries to show those people how hypocritical they were being. The significance of this cartoon is that it displays the movement in restricting immigration when the people trying to restrict it are former or ancestors of immigrants and some of them have lived the American dream. Many old immigrants are successful businessmen and politicians and it is only fair if new immigrants would get the same opportunity.
    CDS
    {http://cartoons.osu.edu/nast/images/the_american_river_ganges25.jpg}
    htmldiff2"The American Ganges" Nast, Thomas, September 30, 1871
    htmldiff3The American River Ganges htmldiff4is an informative political cartoon that was published on September 30, 1871 in htmldiff5Harper’s Weekly htmldiff6by Thomas Nast htmldiff7. htmldiff8This cartoon is suggesting that immigration and the refusal to assimilate to have corrupted the school systems in New York. With the increase in Irish immigration, Roman Catholic schools started to show up all around New York during the 1870’s. Many Catholics dropped out of the mostly protestant public school system to attend these newly founded Roman Catholic schools, usually founded by the Irish themselves. However, when a powerful political machine located in New York City, which was based in Tammy Hall, forced the democratic legislation to pass a law that provided government funding for Irish Catholic schools, the htmldiff9Harper’s Weekly htmldiff10acted. The htmldiff11Harper’s Weekly htmldiff12closely associated itself with the Republican Party so it is acceptable to suggest this cartoon would go against a piece of Democratic legislation. In response to this law, Nast and htmldiff13Harper’s Weekly htmldiff14posted this political cartoon. It shows Tammy Hall politicians lowering children from a destroyed public school with the universal distress symbol over it (The American flag upside down) into the “American River Ganges” which is full of crocodiles dressed as Bishops. The crocodiles dressed as Bishops, as well as the Tammy Hall Politicians, represented the Catholics taking children away from the public school system and forcing them into Catholic schools. This was significant at the time because of the tension between Protestants and Catholics especially in the school systems and between the Irish and Americans.

    Political Cartoons--Period 5
    CMA
    (view changes)
    8:05 am
  4. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited ... {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/Standard_oil_octopus_loc_color.jpg} Udo …
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    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/Standard_oil_octopus_loc_color.jpg}
    Udo Keppler created the “Next!” cartoon about the standard oil octopus. Udo Keppler was the son of Joseph Keppler, who was also a political cartoonist. Joseph Keppler co-founded Puck magazine, which Udo Keppler would later work for. Udo Keppler was the honorary chief of the Seneca nation and was a huge Indian activist. Udo Keppler fought hard for Indians, getting railroad rates discounted for the Indians of New York. His most famous cartoon, “Next!”, appeared in Puck magazine in 1904. Puck probably did not influence the style of the cartoon. However, 1904 was a time associated with big business and corrupted government, and this was the whole motive and meaning of the cartoon. This cartoon was intended for the common citizen, encouraging him to unionize and put up no longer with this oil dominance. In its intentions to persuade citizens to disapprove of oil dominance, this cartoon most likely exaggerated the circumstances of the situations at that time. This cartoon portrayed oil companies as power thirsty dictators, like an octopus, with so many tentacles it was capable of securing every angle their success. This cartoon played a huge role in encouraging citizens to disapprove of this unfair economy.
    VG
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/The_only_one_barred_out_cph.3b48680.jpg}
    The political cartoon “The Only One Barred Out” was created in the late 1800’s in response to the Chinese Exclusion Act during the Gilded Age. This cartoon was created in 1882 by an anonymous source and was published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, a literary and news magazine founded in New York in 1852. Not much is known about the author who created this source, but his viewpoint on the Chinese Exclusion Act is clearly depicted. The author depicts a stereotypical Chinese man being seated outside the Golden Gate of Liberty. The caption reads, “We must draw the line somewhere you know.” Another sign says that admittance to hoodlums, communists, nihilists, socialists, and fenians who bring havoc and catastrophe are free to enter the United States, while the Chinese men who bring industry, peace, and order are not permitted to enter. The author shows through this cartoon that with the Chinese Exclusion Act the US will also be barring out peace, sobriety, increase of industry, and order.
    The Chinese Exclusion Act was signed into law in May of 1882. This law was written for the US to ban Chinese Immigration due to the influx of Chinese due to the California Gold Rush in the 1850’s and continued with subsequent large labor projects, like the building of the First Transcontinental Railroad. During the early years of the gold rush, the Chinese and other immigrants were well received and tolerated, but as time progressed and gold became harder to find, the tolerance for these immigrants decreased significantly. Many anti-Chinese organizations were formed and blamed the Chinese for the Chinese for depressing wage levels since they were willing to work for many hours with low pay.
    This cartoon was created by its author to show to anyone opposed to the immigration of the Chinese the injustice that these immigrants had to face because they wanted the jobs nobody else wanted to do. This cartoon was created by an American who was not opposed to foreign immigration, therefore could have potential bias, just because the US banned the Chinese from immigrating does not necessarily mean that peace and order cease to exist just because there are no Chinese immigrants. This cartoon is significant during this period in time because it mocks the legislation for barring out the Chinese even though they bring potential benefits with them.

    (view changes)
    7:42 am

Wednesday, February 6

  1. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited ... "A Sudden Awakening," W. Rogers, Harper's Weekly, 1901 My cartoon was featured in a…
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    "A Sudden Awakening," W. Rogers, Harper's Weekly, 1901
    My cartoon was featured in a magazine called Harpers Weekly, which is based in New York.. Harpers weekly was started in 1857 and ran until 1916. It included all things from foreign and domestic news to fiction to essays on a number of topics. Some of it’s best known cartoons were done by famous cartoonist Thomas Nast. The cartoon that I am focusing on was published on June 22, 1901. The artist of the Cartoon, William Rogers, was not a fan of big business and had portrayed large corporations as evil entities that are destroying America and making a profit doing it. The cartoon is titled “A Sudden awakening”, and at first glance it looks to be a cartoon showing the growth of the American steel business shocking European steel giants. The audience of this cartoon would have been mostly Republicans at the time because the newspaper leaned to the Republican side. They had influence in the election of President Grant and many others, as well as a campaign against corrupt New York politician Boss Tweed. However Harpers weekly was not completely stratified to one political party and tried to not be over biased. The main idea that the cartoon is trying to convey deals with the founding of The American Steel Company in 1901. The cartoon shows a monster with a train and a head and a bridge with “American Steel” written on it as the torso. Then, in a bed, sits John Bull and other European steel leaders shocked to see the American monster. Rogers is trying to say that the rapid growth of American steel has the potential to take over the European market and dominate the worlds steel industry. This cartoon and time period is significant because of the ASC took control of 60% of U.S. steel and later grew to have a larger gross income than the U.S. government. The U.S. is a world superpower and for one company to have a larger income than them, the ASC had to be massive. This put fear into the Europeans and it is rightly portrayed in this cartoon.
    VG
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/The_only_one_barred_out_cph.3b48680.jpg}
    The political cartoon “The Only One Barred Out” was
    AAM
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/Standard_oil_octopus_loc_color.jpg}
    Udo Keppler
    created in the late 1800’s in response to the Chinese Exclusion Act during the Gilded Age. This“Next!” cartoon was created in 1882 by an anonymous source and was published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, a literary and news magazine founded in New York in 1852. Not much is known about the authorstandard oil octopus. Udo Keppler was the son of Joseph Keppler, who created this source, but his viewpoint on the Chinese Exclusion Act is clearly depicted. The author depictswas also a stereotypical Chinese man being seated outsidepolitical cartoonist. Joseph Keppler co-founded Puck magazine, which Udo Keppler would later work for. Udo Keppler was the Golden Gatehonorary chief of Liberty. The caption reads, “We must draw the line somewhere you know.” Another sign says that admittance to hoodlums, communists, nihilists, socialists,Seneca nation and fenians who bring havoc and catastrophe are free to enter the United States, while the Chinese men who bring industry, peace, and order are not permitted to enter. The author shows through this cartoon that with the Chinese Exclusion Act the US will also be barring out peace, sobriety, increase of industry, and order.
    The Chinese Exclusion Act
    was signed into law in May of 1882. This law was writtena huge Indian activist. Udo Keppler fought hard for Indians, getting railroad rates discounted for the US to ban Chinese Immigration due to the influxIndians of Chinese due to the California Gold RushNew York. His most famous cartoon, “Next!”, appeared in Puck magazine in 1904. Puck probably did not influence the 1850’s and continued with subsequent large labor projects, like the buildingstyle of the First Transcontinental Railroad. During the early years of the gold rush, the Chinesecartoon. However, 1904 was a time associated with big business and other immigrants were well receivedcorrupted government, and tolerated, but as time progressed and gold became harder to find,this was the tolerance for these immigrants decreased significantly. Many anti-Chinese organizations were formedwhole motive and blamedmeaning of the Chinesecartoon. This cartoon was intended for the Chinese for depressing wage levels since they were willingcommon citizen, encouraging him to work for many hoursunionize and put up no longer with low pay.
    This cartoon was created by
    this oil dominance. In its authorintentions to show to anyone opposedpersuade citizens to disapprove of oil dominance, this cartoon most likely exaggerated the immigrationcircumstances of the Chinese the injusticesituations at that these immigrants had to face because they wanted the jobs nobody else wanted to do.time. This cartoon was created byportrayed oil companies as power thirsty dictators, like an American whooctopus, with so many tentacles it was not opposed to foreign immigration, therefore could have potential bias, just because the US banned the Chinese from immigrating does not necessarily mean that peace and order cease to exist just because there are no Chinese immigrants.capable of securing every angle their success. This cartoon is significant duringplayed a huge role in encouraging citizens to disapprove of this period in time because it mocks the legislation for barring out the Chinese even though they bring potential benefits with them.unfair economy.
    (view changes)
    9:55 am
  2. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited ... "A Sudden Awakening," W. Rogers, Harper's Weekly, 1901 My cartoon was featured in a…
    ...
    "A Sudden Awakening," W. Rogers, Harper's Weekly, 1901
    My cartoon was featured in a magazine called Harpers Weekly, which is based in New York.. Harpers weekly was started in 1857 and ran until 1916. It included all things from foreign and domestic news to fiction to essays on a number of topics. Some of it’s best known cartoons were done by famous cartoonist Thomas Nast. The cartoon that I am focusing on was published on June 22, 1901. The artist of the Cartoon, William Rogers, was not a fan of big business and had portrayed large corporations as evil entities that are destroying America and making a profit doing it. The cartoon is titled “A Sudden awakening”, and at first glance it looks to be a cartoon showing the growth of the American steel business shocking European steel giants. The audience of this cartoon would have been mostly Republicans at the time because the newspaper leaned to the Republican side. They had influence in the election of President Grant and many others, as well as a campaign against corrupt New York politician Boss Tweed. However Harpers weekly was not completely stratified to one political party and tried to not be over biased. The main idea that the cartoon is trying to convey deals with the founding of The American Steel Company in 1901. The cartoon shows a monster with a train and a head and a bridge with “American Steel” written on it as the torso. Then, in a bed, sits John Bull and other European steel leaders shocked to see the American monster. Rogers is trying to say that the rapid growth of American steel has the potential to take over the European market and dominate the worlds steel industry. This cartoon and time period is significant because of the ASC took control of 60% of U.S. steel and later grew to have a larger gross income than the U.S. government. The U.S. is a world superpower and for one company to have a larger income than them, the ASC had to be massive. This put fear into the Europeans and it is rightly portrayed in this cartoon.
    VG
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/The_only_one_barred_out_cph.3b48680.jpg}
    The political cartoon “The Only One Barred Out” was created in the late 1800’s in response to the Chinese Exclusion Act during the Gilded Age. This cartoon was created in 1882 by an anonymous source and was published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, a literary and news magazine founded in New York in 1852. Not much is known about the author who created this source, but his viewpoint on the Chinese Exclusion Act is clearly depicted. The author depicts a stereotypical Chinese man being seated outside the Golden Gate of Liberty. The caption reads, “We must draw the line somewhere you know.” Another sign says that admittance to hoodlums, communists, nihilists, socialists, and fenians who bring havoc and catastrophe are free to enter the United States, while the Chinese men who bring industry, peace, and order are not permitted to enter. The author shows through this cartoon that with the Chinese Exclusion Act the US will also be barring out peace, sobriety, increase of industry, and order.
    The Chinese Exclusion Act was signed into law in May of 1882. This law was written for the US to ban Chinese Immigration due to the influx of Chinese due to the California Gold Rush in the 1850’s and continued with subsequent large labor projects, like the building of the First Transcontinental Railroad. During the early years of the gold rush, the Chinese and other immigrants were well received and tolerated, but as time progressed and gold became harder to find, the tolerance for these immigrants decreased significantly. Many anti-Chinese organizations were formed and blamed the Chinese for the Chinese for depressing wage levels since they were willing to work for many hours with low pay.
    This cartoon was created by its author to show to anyone opposed to the immigration of the Chinese the injustice that these immigrants had to face because they wanted the jobs nobody else wanted to do. This cartoon was created by an American who was not opposed to foreign immigration, therefore could have potential bias, just because the US banned the Chinese from immigrating does not necessarily mean that peace and order cease to exist just because there are no Chinese immigrants. This cartoon is significant during this period in time because it mocks the legislation for barring out the Chinese even though they bring potential benefits with them.

    (view changes)
    9:52 am
  3. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited (From Spell with Flickr) Political Cartoons- Period W ... {http://americanhistory.unomaha.e…

    (From Spell with Flickr)
    Political Cartoons- Period W
    ...
    {http://americanhistory.unomaha.edu/module_files/funny%20little%20govt.jpg}
    Following the Civil War to the end of the 19th Century, the U.S. experienced a second industrial revolution. With the rise of industry in America followed big businesses such as the Standard Oil Company. Horace Taylor illustrated, The trust giant’s point of view, “What a funny little government” in 1899, which later would be published on January 22, 1900, in the democratic magazine The Verdict. The Verdict was an independent magazine that pushed against trusts and capitalism. Taylor drew many illustrations for this magazine. Taylor along with other democrats felt the government wasn’t doing a good job regulating these businesses as they grew and took control of many aspects regarding the U.S. This was seen as much so that these capitalists controlling their great monopolies had more authority than the government itself, as many were extremely wealthy and either directly or indirectly a part of the government. Capitalists such as Rockefeller controlled almost the entirety of their business. The Standard Oil Company controlled close to all the refineries during the time. These business men took the majority of their profits to rise in power. “What a funny little government” was published in the Verdict so that the common people will see how the white house and government are not controlling the power of capitalism in America as they should be. Too many trusts were being formed and the capitalist empires were booming. Taylor wants the common man to be opposed of reelecting McKinley to a second term as president because in his first the majority that he did was raise tariffs and did little in regulating big business. McKinley saw things from a republican spectrum as the Verdict wanted to promote the Democratic Party just before the election of 1900. The illustration shows Rockefeller looking down on the white house and the President himself. Taylor wanted to show how capitalists rule the U.S. in most aspects through their wealth. These big named business men were multimillionaires. Behind Rockefeller is the capital building with smoke stacks rising from it. The author portrays the government as being run by industrialism and capitalism. Taylor along with other democrats were seeking change in the government to prevent trusts along with big businesses because they were poorly regulating to help the workers as they were being paid very low wages for their work. The significance of the illustration is that big businesses ruled in economic and political power during the latter part of the 19th century. As the common man struggled, democrats wanted to see change through their power involving the government.
    SLE
    {http://www.harpweek.com/Images/SourceImages/CartoonOfTheDay/June/062201l.jpg}
    "A Sudden Awakening," W. Rogers, Harper's Weekly, 1901
    My cartoon was featured in a magazine called Harpers Weekly, which is based in New York.. Harpers weekly was started in 1857 and ran until 1916. It included all things from foreign and domestic news to fiction to essays on a number of topics. Some of it’s best known cartoons were done by famous cartoonist Thomas Nast. The cartoon that I am focusing on was published on June 22, 1901. The artist of the Cartoon, William Rogers, was not a fan of big business and had portrayed large corporations as evil entities that are destroying America and making a profit doing it. The cartoon is titled “A Sudden awakening”, and at first glance it looks to be a cartoon showing the growth of the American steel business shocking European steel giants. The audience of this cartoon would have been mostly Republicans at the time because the newspaper leaned to the Republican side. They had influence in the election of President Grant and many others, as well as a campaign against corrupt New York politician Boss Tweed. However Harpers weekly was not completely stratified to one political party and tried to not be over biased. The main idea that the cartoon is trying to convey deals with the founding of The American Steel Company in 1901. The cartoon shows a monster with a train and a head and a bridge with “American Steel” written on it as the torso. Then, in a bed, sits John Bull and other European steel leaders shocked to see the American monster. Rogers is trying to say that the rapid growth of American steel has the potential to take over the European market and dominate the worlds steel industry. This cartoon and time period is significant because of the ASC took control of 60% of U.S. steel and later grew to have a larger gross income than the U.S. government. The U.S. is a world superpower and for one company to have a larger income than them, the ASC had to be massive. This put fear into the Europeans and it is rightly portrayed in this cartoon.

    (view changes)
    9:47 am
  4. page Unit 6--Gilded Age (1865-1900) edited (From Spell with Flickr) Political Cartoons- Period W ... Political Cartoons--Period 5 CMA…

    (From Spell with Flickr)
    Political Cartoons- Period W
    ...
    Political Cartoons--Period 5
    CMA
    {http://www.harpweek.com/Images/SourceImages/CartoonOfTheDay/October/102088l.jpg}
    http://www.harpweek.com/09Cartoon/BrowseByDateCartoon-Large.asp?Month=October&Date=20 "The Trustworthy Beast." W. Rogers, Harper's Weekly, 1888.
    In the late 1880’s, trusts and monopolies of big businesses such as oil and steel became a widely common idea so much to inspire the cartoon, “The Trustworthy Beast.” The comic depicts Uncle Sam staring skeptically at a monster next to Andrew Carnegie with a warm inviting look on his face. The monster has six heads, each labeled ‘coal trust’, ‘sugar trust’, ‘oil trust’, ‘steel trust’, ‘lumber trust’ and ‘salt trust.’ Underneath the illustration, a quote from Carnegie that says, “The public may regard trusts or combinations with serene confidence.” The main message of this cartoon is that while the tycoons of big business want the public to accept trusts and monopolies, in reality the trusts could only hurt consumer interest.
    (view changes)
    9:15 am

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